Resources, Recognition & Inspiration – September 5, 2012

by Teri Kojetin on September 5, 2012

Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, cialis they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, approved
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, for sale
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, cialis they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, approved
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, for sale
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.

Resources:

Virtual Bookshelves

A virtual bookshelf is an online site where you keep track of the books you’ve read, and books you want to read, rheumatologist share the books you’re reading, and interact with other readers. It’s also a place where authors can promote their own books and connect with people who like to read their particular genre.

The most popular of these bookshelves seems to be Goodreads.

Writer’s Relief published an informative article on their website called 5 Ways Goodreads Can Help Your Writing Career. It shows authors that they can use the site to showcase their books and drive traffic to their websites.

Other virtual bookshelves available are:

Shelfari

Authonomy

Book Glutton

Booktagger

weRead

Revish

LibraryThing

BookJetty

Online Writing Communities

Online writing communities are a great place for writers to connect with other writers, publishers, editors and other writing services. Since there are so many, you will have to determine which are the best ones for you and the type of writing and service you’re looking for.

Here is a list of several writing groups:

Scribophile

WritersCafe

Writing.com

Critique Circle

The Write Idea

WeBook

Nothing Binding

Review Fuse

Quillant

Story Dam

LinkedIn has several groups, including:

Authors, Writers, Publishers, Editors, & Writing Professionals

Authors And Writers

Books and Writers

Book Clubs

Book clubs are also an excellent way for people who love books to read and interact with each other. There are several online clubs where you can become part of group and make new friends while you read new books and chat with other members.

Here are a couple:

The ReadingRoom

Online Book Club

And check out the Books-Club-Resource for all kinds of helpful information whether you’re looking to join or start a book club.

Recognition:

Rather than focus on one person this week, I thought I would highlight a couple of unique book exchange ideas. One is found in England and the other right here in Minnesota where I live.

Book exchanges are a wonderful idea to share books without having to purchase. When I saw an example of this I was delighted by the idea and the whimsical charm.

Minnesota:

Book Boxes Invite Exchange

England:

Phone Box Becomes Book Exchange

Inspiration:

I love books. I love to read. I love sharing books with others. I love discovering new books to read. I share these loves with millions of other people. I hope you enjoyed all the ways you can connect with others as a reader and/or author.

Enjoy! Share! Enjoy!

“Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we have the opportunity of sharing it with others.” -Jean-Nicolas Bouilly

Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, cialis they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, approved
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, for sale
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.

Resources:

Virtual Bookshelves

A virtual bookshelf is an online site where you keep track of the books you’ve read, and books you want to read, rheumatologist share the books you’re reading, and interact with other readers. It’s also a place where authors can promote their own books and connect with people who like to read their particular genre.

The most popular of these bookshelves seems to be Goodreads.

Writer’s Relief published an informative article on their website called 5 Ways Goodreads Can Help Your Writing Career. It shows authors that they can use the site to showcase their books and drive traffic to their websites.

Other virtual bookshelves available are:

Shelfari

Authonomy

Book Glutton

Booktagger

weRead

Revish

LibraryThing

BookJetty

Online Writing Communities

Online writing communities are a great place for writers to connect with other writers, publishers, editors and other writing services. Since there are so many, you will have to determine which are the best ones for you and the type of writing and service you’re looking for.

Here is a list of several writing groups:

Scribophile

WritersCafe

Writing.com

Critique Circle

The Write Idea

WeBook

Nothing Binding

Review Fuse

Quillant

Story Dam

LinkedIn has several groups, including:

Authors, Writers, Publishers, Editors, & Writing Professionals

Authors And Writers

Books and Writers

Book Clubs

Book clubs are also an excellent way for people who love books to read and interact with each other. There are several online clubs where you can become part of group and make new friends while you read new books and chat with other members.

Here are a couple:

The ReadingRoom

Online Book Club

And check out the Books-Club-Resource for all kinds of helpful information whether you’re looking to join or start a book club.

Recognition:

Rather than focus on one person this week, I thought I would highlight a couple of unique book exchange ideas. One is found in England and the other right here in Minnesota where I live.

Book exchanges are a wonderful idea to share books without having to purchase. When I saw an example of this I was delighted by the idea and the whimsical charm.

Minnesota:

Book Boxes Invite Exchange

England:

Phone Box Becomes Book Exchange

Inspiration:

I love books. I love to read. I love sharing books with others. I love discovering new books to read. I share these loves with millions of other people. I hope you enjoyed all the ways you can connect with others as a reader and/or author.

Enjoy! Share! Enjoy!

“Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we have the opportunity of sharing it with others.” -Jean-Nicolas Bouilly

Resources:

Virtual Bookshelves

A virtual bookshelf is an online site where you keep track of the books you’ve read, case books you want to read, share the books you’re reading, and interact with other readers. It’s also a place where authors can promote their own books and connect with people who like to read their particular genre.

The most popular of these bookshelves seems to be Goodreads.

Writer’s Relief published an informative article on their website called 5 Ways Goodreads Can Help Your Writing Career. It shows authors that they can use the site to showcase their books and drive traffic to their websites.

Other virtual bookshelves available are:

Shelfari

Authonomy

Book Glutton

Booktagger

weRead

Revish

LibraryThing

BookJetty

Online Writing Communities

Online writing communities are a great place for writers to connect with other writers, publishers, editors and other writing services. Since there are so many, you will have to determine which are the best ones for you and the type of writing and service you’re looking for.

Here is a list of several writing groups:

Scribophile

WritersCafe

Writing.com

Critique Circle

The Write Idea

WeBook

Nothing Binding

Review Fuse

Quillant

Story Dam

LinkedIn has several groups, including:

Authors, Writers, Publishers, Editors, & Writing Professionals

Authors And Writers

Books and Writers

Book Clubs

Book clubs are also an excellent way for people who love books to read and interact with each other. There are several online clubs where you can become part of group and make new friends while you read new books and chat with other members.

Here are a couple:

The ReadingRoom

Online Book Club

And check out the Books-Club-Resource for all kinds of helpful information whether you’re looking to join or start a book club.

Recognition:

Rather than focus on one person this week, I thought I would highlight a couple of unique book exchange ideas. One is found in England and the other right here in Minnesota where I live.

Book exchanges are a wonderful idea to share books without having to purchase. When I saw an example of this I was delighted by the idea and the whimsical charm.

Minnesota:

Book Boxes Invite Exchange

England:

Phone Box Becomes Book Exchange

Inspiration:

I love books. I love to read. I love sharing books with others. I love discovering new books to read. I share these loves with millions of other people. I hope you enjoyed all the ways you can connect with others as a reader and/or author.

Enjoy! Share! Enjoy!

“Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we have the opportunity of sharing it with others.” -Jean-Nicolas Bouilly

Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, cialis they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, approved
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, for sale
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.

Resources:

Virtual Bookshelves

A virtual bookshelf is an online site where you keep track of the books you’ve read, and books you want to read, rheumatologist share the books you’re reading, and interact with other readers. It’s also a place where authors can promote their own books and connect with people who like to read their particular genre.

The most popular of these bookshelves seems to be Goodreads.

Writer’s Relief published an informative article on their website called 5 Ways Goodreads Can Help Your Writing Career. It shows authors that they can use the site to showcase their books and drive traffic to their websites.

Other virtual bookshelves available are:

Shelfari

Authonomy

Book Glutton

Booktagger

weRead

Revish

LibraryThing

BookJetty

Online Writing Communities

Online writing communities are a great place for writers to connect with other writers, publishers, editors and other writing services. Since there are so many, you will have to determine which are the best ones for you and the type of writing and service you’re looking for.

Here is a list of several writing groups:

Scribophile

WritersCafe

Writing.com

Critique Circle

The Write Idea

WeBook

Nothing Binding

Review Fuse

Quillant

Story Dam

LinkedIn has several groups, including:

Authors, Writers, Publishers, Editors, & Writing Professionals

Authors And Writers

Books and Writers

Book Clubs

Book clubs are also an excellent way for people who love books to read and interact with each other. There are several online clubs where you can become part of group and make new friends while you read new books and chat with other members.

Here are a couple:

The ReadingRoom

Online Book Club

And check out the Books-Club-Resource for all kinds of helpful information whether you’re looking to join or start a book club.

Recognition:

Rather than focus on one person this week, I thought I would highlight a couple of unique book exchange ideas. One is found in England and the other right here in Minnesota where I live.

Book exchanges are a wonderful idea to share books without having to purchase. When I saw an example of this I was delighted by the idea and the whimsical charm.

Minnesota:

Book Boxes Invite Exchange

England:

Phone Box Becomes Book Exchange

Inspiration:

I love books. I love to read. I love sharing books with others. I love discovering new books to read. I share these loves with millions of other people. I hope you enjoyed all the ways you can connect with others as a reader and/or author.

Enjoy! Share! Enjoy!

“Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we have the opportunity of sharing it with others.” -Jean-Nicolas Bouilly

Resources:

Virtual Bookshelves

A virtual bookshelf is an online site where you keep track of the books you’ve read, case books you want to read, share the books you’re reading, and interact with other readers. It’s also a place where authors can promote their own books and connect with people who like to read their particular genre.

The most popular of these bookshelves seems to be Goodreads.

Writer’s Relief published an informative article on their website called 5 Ways Goodreads Can Help Your Writing Career. It shows authors that they can use the site to showcase their books and drive traffic to their websites.

Other virtual bookshelves available are:

Shelfari

Authonomy

Book Glutton

Booktagger

weRead

Revish

LibraryThing

BookJetty

Online Writing Communities

Online writing communities are a great place for writers to connect with other writers, publishers, editors and other writing services. Since there are so many, you will have to determine which are the best ones for you and the type of writing and service you’re looking for.

Here is a list of several writing groups:

Scribophile

WritersCafe

Writing.com

Critique Circle

The Write Idea

WeBook

Nothing Binding

Review Fuse

Quillant

Story Dam

LinkedIn has several groups, including:

Authors, Writers, Publishers, Editors, & Writing Professionals

Authors And Writers

Books and Writers

Book Clubs

Book clubs are also an excellent way for people who love books to read and interact with each other. There are several online clubs where you can become part of group and make new friends while you read new books and chat with other members.

Here are a couple:

The ReadingRoom

Online Book Club

And check out the Books-Club-Resource for all kinds of helpful information whether you’re looking to join or start a book club.

Recognition:

Rather than focus on one person this week, I thought I would highlight a couple of unique book exchange ideas. One is found in England and the other right here in Minnesota where I live.

Book exchanges are a wonderful idea to share books without having to purchase. When I saw an example of this I was delighted by the idea and the whimsical charm.

Minnesota:

Book Boxes Invite Exchange

England:

Phone Box Becomes Book Exchange

Inspiration:

I love books. I love to read. I love sharing books with others. I love discovering new books to read. I share these loves with millions of other people. I hope you enjoyed all the ways you can connect with others as a reader and/or author.

Enjoy! Share! Enjoy!

“Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we have the opportunity of sharing it with others.” -Jean-Nicolas Bouilly

EDITING YOUR BOOK

RESOURCES:

The Importance of Editing

Obviously editing is important. Can you imagine reading an unedited book? What would you feel? Frustrated? Annoyed? Confused? Editing is important so that you don’t lose readers.

Once you have written and rewritten your book several times, decease you may think you’re done. This is when the value of an outside eye is important. It’s too easy to miss something no matter how many times you reread it. You can rely on spellcheck for basic grammar and spelling, one health but it doesn’t catch everything either.

Self-edit first and then find either a friend or hire a service to go over your book. Once you’ve done as much as you can on your own, you’re ready for a professional editor.

 

The Mechanics of Editing

Here are a couple articles of what to look for when you edit your book:

Proofreading & Editing Tips, A compilation of advice from experienced proofreaders and editors

How to Edit Your Own Writing (Self-Editing)

 

Editing Tools

Here are some online sites to help you as you write and edit:

Paradigm Online Writing Assistant

Writing@CSU

How To Edit Your Writing Online

 

RECOGNITION:

Born on a farm in Minnesota, Chris did a stint in the Air Force and then received a degree in chemical engineering. After a boring career in the paper industry, he got his teaching degree and helped start a charter school for the arts where he taught every science and math class. Eventually, entrepreneurship took hold and now Chris runs Editing Your World, a professional editing services company, Red Willow Publishing, a niche non-fiction publisher, and participates in The Ebook Editor. He lives near Moscow, ID.

 

He is also an editor and gives this viewpoint on the subject:

Editing is one of those ideas that everyone agrees is important, but few actually make the effort. Sure, you’ll go through your writing and try to fix mistakes, you might even put a little thought into the flow and development, but do you put your money where your mouth is and actually hire a professional editor?

Probably not.

And that’s too bad, because even excellent writers—even people who are editors themselves—benefit greatly from hiring a professional editor.

The effects of poorly-edited writing are long lasting, very long lasting. Once somebody reads your poorly-edited writing, your reputation is shot and it’ll be difficult to recover. Let’s say you publish several blog posts that are decently written and properly edited and then you post one that isn’t. That’s right, your one poorly-edited blog post is what they’ll always remember.

A professional editor will not only catch the small stuff—like misspelling, punctuation, and grammar—they’ll know how to help your writing convey the right message, flow smoothly, and really POP.

You’ll receive the best results if you do as much self editing as possible before you send your manuscript to your professional editor. You want your editor to catch all the small stuff, but you want them to be able to focus on the big stuff. So you want to catch as much small stuff as possible. To prepare for this chore, buy Punctuation for Writers by Harvey Stanbrough. This is the only editing book you need for the small stuff.

So how do you find a great professional editor? Easy. Chris O’Byrne is a highly-qualified professional editor who has been editing both fiction and nonfiction for several years. He’s friendly and easy to work with and helps your writing go from good to great.

 

INSPIRATION:

The Joy of the Rewrite

Instead of looking at rewriting and editing as a chore, think of it as an opportunity to improve our writing and maybe even find a new way to describe something or express your thoughts.

“The beautiful part of writing is that you don’t have to get it right the first time, unlike, say, a brain surgeon. You can always do better, find the exact word, the apt phrase, the leaping smile.” -Robert Cormier
Resources:

Simplify Your Writing 

Chris O’Byrne, page who happens to be my brother and mentor in the ebook biz, troche wrote a concise article on simplifying writing. He practices simplicity in his lifestyle and writing. Here’s what he has to say:

How to Simplify Your Writing

Many people feel that writing eloquently in flowery language with many words is the best way to sound like they’re a “writer.” The truth is usually the opposite. The more concisely and simply that you write and the fewer words you use to get your point across, the better and more effective your writing is. Here’s an example:

I told her that I just felt she would really be considered to be much, much more of an expert if she read up on the subject before she attempted to carry forth a discourse on the subject at hand.

Sounds impressive, doesn’t it? However, the reader will better understand what you’re trying to say if you wrote this:

I told her she would sound smarter if she actually knew what she was talking about.

Take the time to self-edit and make your writing cleaner by removing words such as just, really, and up. Don’t use words like much and very more than once and avoid them unless they’re necessary. Read your writing aloud to actually hear what it sounds like and please take the time to make your writing cleaner, simpler, and effective.

Zen and Mind Mapping

I read an inspiring article recently by Chuck Frey called How To Achieve Zen-like Simplicity When Writing. In it he talks about ordinary writing and how to write with clarity using mind mapping.

For more information on mind mapping, take a look at The Mind Mapping Software Blog.

You can use software or for a simpler method, just get a blank page journal and do it yourself.

Minimizing Your Writing Work Space

Unclutterer.com is a blog about “getting and staying organized. A place for everything and everything in its place is our gospel.” I like having special things around me but in my workspace I prefer orderliness so I can get more done and avoid distractions. If you feel the same way, or wish you did, you might want to read some of their blog entries. One that I found particularly helpful is Creating a minimalist workspace – from Leo Babauta of Zen Habits. He writes that “an uncluttered workspace is a thing of beauty” and I have to agree. He tells you how to create an uncluttered workspace that fits your needs.

Recognition:

Since I’m talking about simplicity, Zen and minimal writing, I would like to introduce you to someone who is an expert in the minimalist lifestyle:

Joshua Becker and Becoming Minimalist

Joshua’s blog, Becoming Minimalist, is one of the country’s most popular websites on minimalism and simple living reaching over 100,000 monthly visitors. His story has been seen on the CBS Evening News, the Huffington Post, National Public Radio, the Guardian, and countless others media outlets around the world. His previous book, Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life, spent 12 days as the #1 Self-Help book on Amazon in November 2011. His most recent book, Living With Less: An Unexpected Key to Happiness is written to encourage students and young adults to live more life by owning fewer possessions. He lives in Peoria, AZ with his wife and two young children.

We have written three books. The first two were self-published (and the Ebook Editor was incredibly helpful during the process). For the most recent book, we chose to use a traditional publisher. All three books carry the same message: There is more joy to be found in owning fewer possessions than can be found in pursuing more. But each of these

addresses the topic from a completely different vantage point. Our first book, Simplify, encourages families to embrace the seven principles needed to declutter their homes and lives. Our second book, Inside-Out Simplicity, begins to journey inward and addresses some of the heart and soul issues necessary to fully embrace a simplified life. Our third and most recent project, Living With Less, is written for students and young adults. It also chooses to address the invitation of simplicity for a distinct Christian viewpoint.

We embraced a simple, minimalist lifestyle only 4 years ago. Up until that point, we were living a pretty typical suburban lifestyle. One Saturday afternoon while cleaning out my garage, I was mentioning to my neighbor how much time and energy was being required of me to simply manage my possessions (not even considering all the time I’ve spent just earning the money to buy all of them). My neighbor’s response changed our lives forever. She said, “Well maybe you don’t need to own all this stuff.” And a rational minimalist was born. Since that conversation we have worked hard to “promote the things in life we most value and remove everything that distracts us from it.” And we’ve never regretted making that decision.

Inspiration: 

Simplicity. Making changes in our life that leads to more simplicity will cut down on stress, wasted time and distractions. When our life is uncluttered by things it will be reflected in what we produce and the way we live.

Here are some quotes on simplicity:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Leonardo da Vinci

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.” – E.F. Schumacher

“One should use common words to say uncommon things.” – Arthur Schopenhauer

 

 

 

 

 
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Writing a book, allergy even a short one, can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, and they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, salve it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, malady
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, nurse it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, medicine
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, decease
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, caries
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, more about
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, cialis they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, approved
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, for sale
Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

Interest/Thought
Desire/Feeling
Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.

The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book, which is exactly what I’m doing in this blog post.  🙂

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.

Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Let’s look at each of those places. If you can’t get the keywords in the book title, at least put them in the subtitle. The title of Denise’s book is Second-Chance Mother. While that doesn’t provide much information of what the book is about, her subtitle does— A Memoir of Adoption, Loss, and Reunion.

The book description should also include as many of your identified keywords as possible. The trick is to incorporate them into the description. Amazon allows you to have a description up to 4,000 characters long, so make the most of it. Provide as much information as possible and use all of your keywords if you can manage it.

The last place to incorporate your keywords is in the actual keywords field. You can enter up to 7 keywords while uploading your book to Amazon Kindle or your print book via CreateSpace.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.

Resources:

Virtual Bookshelves

A virtual bookshelf is an online site where you keep track of the books you’ve read, and books you want to read, rheumatologist share the books you’re reading, and interact with other readers. It’s also a place where authors can promote their own books and connect with people who like to read their particular genre.

The most popular of these bookshelves seems to be Goodreads.

Writer’s Relief published an informative article on their website called 5 Ways Goodreads Can Help Your Writing Career. It shows authors that they can use the site to showcase their books and drive traffic to their websites.

Other virtual bookshelves available are:

Shelfari

Authonomy

Book Glutton

Booktagger

weRead

Revish

LibraryThing

BookJetty

Online Writing Communities

Online writing communities are a great place for writers to connect with other writers, publishers, editors and other writing services. Since there are so many, you will have to determine which are the best ones for you and the type of writing and service you’re looking for.

Here is a list of several writing groups:

Scribophile

WritersCafe

Writing.com

Critique Circle

The Write Idea

WeBook

Nothing Binding

Review Fuse

Quillant

Story Dam

LinkedIn has several groups, including:

Authors, Writers, Publishers, Editors, & Writing Professionals

Authors And Writers

Books and Writers

Book Clubs

Book clubs are also an excellent way for people who love books to read and interact with each other. There are several online clubs where you can become part of group and make new friends while you read new books and chat with other members.

Here are a couple:

The ReadingRoom

Online Book Club

And check out the Books-Club-Resource for all kinds of helpful information whether you’re looking to join or start a book club.

Recognition:

Rather than focus on one person this week, I thought I would highlight a couple of unique book exchange ideas. One is found in England and the other right here in Minnesota where I live.

Book exchanges are a wonderful idea to share books without having to purchase. When I saw an example of this I was delighted by the idea and the whimsical charm.

Minnesota:

Book Boxes Invite Exchange

England:

Phone Box Becomes Book Exchange

Inspiration:

I love books. I love to read. I love sharing books with others. I love discovering new books to read. I share these loves with millions of other people. I hope you enjoyed all the ways you can connect with others as a reader and/or author.

Enjoy! Share! Enjoy!

“Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we have the opportunity of sharing it with others.” -Jean-Nicolas Bouilly

Resources:

Virtual Bookshelves

A virtual bookshelf is an online site where you keep track of the books you’ve read, case books you want to read, share the books you’re reading, and interact with other readers. It’s also a place where authors can promote their own books and connect with people who like to read their particular genre.

The most popular of these bookshelves seems to be Goodreads.

Writer’s Relief published an informative article on their website called 5 Ways Goodreads Can Help Your Writing Career. It shows authors that they can use the site to showcase their books and drive traffic to their websites.

Other virtual bookshelves available are:

Shelfari

Authonomy

Book Glutton

Booktagger

weRead

Revish

LibraryThing

BookJetty

Online Writing Communities

Online writing communities are a great place for writers to connect with other writers, publishers, editors and other writing services. Since there are so many, you will have to determine which are the best ones for you and the type of writing and service you’re looking for.

Here is a list of several writing groups:

Scribophile

WritersCafe

Writing.com

Critique Circle

The Write Idea

WeBook

Nothing Binding

Review Fuse

Quillant

Story Dam

LinkedIn has several groups, including:

Authors, Writers, Publishers, Editors, & Writing Professionals

Authors And Writers

Books and Writers

Book Clubs

Book clubs are also an excellent way for people who love books to read and interact with each other. There are several online clubs where you can become part of group and make new friends while you read new books and chat with other members.

Here are a couple:

The ReadingRoom

Online Book Club

And check out the Books-Club-Resource for all kinds of helpful information whether you’re looking to join or start a book club.

Recognition:

Rather than focus on one person this week, I thought I would highlight a couple of unique book exchange ideas. One is found in England and the other right here in Minnesota where I live.

Book exchanges are a wonderful idea to share books without having to purchase. When I saw an example of this I was delighted by the idea and the whimsical charm.

Minnesota:

Book Boxes Invite Exchange

England:

Phone Box Becomes Book Exchange

Inspiration:

I love books. I love to read. I love sharing books with others. I love discovering new books to read. I share these loves with millions of other people. I hope you enjoyed all the ways you can connect with others as a reader and/or author.

Enjoy! Share! Enjoy!

“Whatever we possess becomes of double value when we have the opportunity of sharing it with others.” -Jean-Nicolas Bouilly

EDITING YOUR BOOK

RESOURCES:

The Importance of Editing

Obviously editing is important. Can you imagine reading an unedited book? What would you feel? Frustrated? Annoyed? Confused? Editing is important so that you don’t lose readers.

Once you have written and rewritten your book several times, decease you may think you’re done. This is when the value of an outside eye is important. It’s too easy to miss something no matter how many times you reread it. You can rely on spellcheck for basic grammar and spelling, one health but it doesn’t catch everything either.

Self-edit first and then find either a friend or hire a service to go over your book. Once you’ve done as much as you can on your own, you’re ready for a professional editor.

 

The Mechanics of Editing

Here are a couple articles of what to look for when you edit your book:

Proofreading & Editing Tips, A compilation of advice from experienced proofreaders and editors

How to Edit Your Own Writing (Self-Editing)

 

Editing Tools

Here are some online sites to help you as you write and edit:

Paradigm Online Writing Assistant

Writing@CSU

How To Edit Your Writing Online

 

RECOGNITION:

Born on a farm in Minnesota, Chris did a stint in the Air Force and then received a degree in chemical engineering. After a boring career in the paper industry, he got his teaching degree and helped start a charter school for the arts where he taught every science and math class. Eventually, entrepreneurship took hold and now Chris runs Editing Your World, a professional editing services company, Red Willow Publishing, a niche non-fiction publisher, and participates in The Ebook Editor. He lives near Moscow, ID.

 

He is also an editor and gives this viewpoint on the subject:

Editing is one of those ideas that everyone agrees is important, but few actually make the effort. Sure, you’ll go through your writing and try to fix mistakes, you might even put a little thought into the flow and development, but do you put your money where your mouth is and actually hire a professional editor?

Probably not.

And that’s too bad, because even excellent writers—even people who are editors themselves—benefit greatly from hiring a professional editor.

The effects of poorly-edited writing are long lasting, very long lasting. Once somebody reads your poorly-edited writing, your reputation is shot and it’ll be difficult to recover. Let’s say you publish several blog posts that are decently written and properly edited and then you post one that isn’t. That’s right, your one poorly-edited blog post is what they’ll always remember.

A professional editor will not only catch the small stuff—like misspelling, punctuation, and grammar—they’ll know how to help your writing convey the right message, flow smoothly, and really POP.

You’ll receive the best results if you do as much self editing as possible before you send your manuscript to your professional editor. You want your editor to catch all the small stuff, but you want them to be able to focus on the big stuff. So you want to catch as much small stuff as possible. To prepare for this chore, buy Punctuation for Writers by Harvey Stanbrough. This is the only editing book you need for the small stuff.

So how do you find a great professional editor? Easy. Chris O’Byrne is a highly-qualified professional editor who has been editing both fiction and nonfiction for several years. He’s friendly and easy to work with and helps your writing go from good to great.

 

INSPIRATION:

The Joy of the Rewrite

Instead of looking at rewriting and editing as a chore, think of it as an opportunity to improve our writing and maybe even find a new way to describe something or express your thoughts.

“The beautiful part of writing is that you don’t have to get it right the first time, unlike, say, a brain surgeon. You can always do better, find the exact word, the apt phrase, the leaping smile.” -Robert Cormier

Resources:

The Writer and the Practice of Journaling

Journaling is the practice of writing down your thoughts. Where it goes from there is entirely up to you. A journal is personal and something we don’t usually share with others. Apart from its emotional and learning benefits, psychiatrist it can be valuable practice for writers. It’s a chance to write randomly instead of working on a book or article. There is no pressure. It can be done on paper or on a computer, although I personally prefer paper for journaling since it’s a spontaneous practice.

There are many types of journaling. You can write about daily happenings, past experiences, feelings, things that have special meaning for you, memories—anything at all. I have a journal where I write daily messages to my granddaughter, another for ideas, and one for free writing about whatever strikes my fancy. Throughout the years, I’ve also journaled off and on about daily life. Whatever type you practice, the benefit is the same: you learn to get your thoughts down on paper and reap increased writing skills along with the satisfaction of seeing words and ideas emerge and fill the pages. Your reflections and thoughts aren’t lost and you can go back to see how you’ve grown as well as garner new ideas for your professional writing.

Blogging Tips

Blogging is similar to the practice of journaling. Blogging is journaling online and it can be about anything at all. Your writing can be personal, about business, or anything you can dream up. The fun side of blogging is the ability to attach images. While journaling is primarily for your own personal use and viewing, blogging is purposely used to share what you write with others.

Here are 10 great tips for bloggers from RSS Specifications:

10 Tips for Bloggers

Blogging Can’t Replace Journaling by Carol Bodensteiner

For years I journaled, filling dozens of notebooks with mental wanderings – the events of the day, my thoughts, my joys, my hurts. Some days, I’d sit on the deck with my journal for more than an hour, enjoying a cup of coffee, watching nature unfold in our backyard, letting the journal do its healing work. Often by the time I finished writing, I’d have worked through some thought process, solved some mental problem I didn’t even know I had.

When I took up blogging, I journaled less. I enjoyed the challenge of fitting my thoughts into 300 – 400 words. Beyond that, there was only so much writing time in my day. Even though I’d heard that blog posts should only take a half hour to write, by the time I clarified a thought, wrote it cogently, and found an image, the process always took much longer.

I reconciled my thinking with the argument that my blog was serving the same purpose as my journal. But I was wrong. 

I’ve realized as time has gone on that blog writing is edited writing in more ways than one. It’s a single thought as clearly stated as I can make it. It’s a single thought I’m willing to put out to the world. Frustrated with a work assignment? Spat with my husband? Anger at some perceived injustice? I know some people air all that laundry in their blogs, but that’s not me.

More important, though, I couldn’t spill all that out because it’s writing about an event that helps me understand not only the details of what happened but also why it affects me so and what I could possibly do to resolve the issue and get myself to a better place. It’s writing as I used to do in my journal – rambling on for 5-10 pages – that helps me get my head around the problem.

When anxiety had built to an unbearable level in my chest last week, I finally realized I needed to write freely, for myself, without an audience. I needed my journal back. So, yesterday, I was back on the deck, journal and pen in one hand, cup of coffee in the other. I wrote for two hours. And believe me, I feel better.

So whether there’s time in my life, or not, I’ll be journaling again.

If you journal or blog, I’m interested in your thoughts on how the two are different. Come join the conversation at my blog: www.carolbodensteiner.com

Recognition:

I came across Carol Bodensteiner’s blog and her book, Growing Up Country intrigued me. I bought the ebook and loved it! I enjoy reading her blog and this week she wrote a blog about blogging and journaling, which I posted in the Resources section of this blog post.

Carol Bodensteiner is a writer who finds inspiration in the places, people, culture and history of the Midwest. After a successful career in public relations consulting, she turned to creative writing. She published a memoir – Growing Up Country: Memories of an Iowa Farm Girl – and is working on a novel.

 

Contact Carol:

http://www.carolbodensteiner.com

Twitter @CABodensteiner

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CarolBodensteinerAuthor

Carol’s book Growing Up Country: Memories of an Iowa Farm Girl captures rural life in middle America, in the middle of the 20th Century. Carol Bodensteiner grew up on a family-owned dairy farm in the 1950s, a time when a family could make a good living on 180 acres. In these pages you can step back and relish a time simple but not easy, a time innocent yet challenging. If you grew up in rural America, these stories will trigger your memories and your senses, releasing a wealth of stories of your own. If the rural Midwest is foreign territory to you, Carol’s stories will invite you into a fascinating and disappearing world.

Growing Up Country is available in paperback at Barnes & Noble and as an ebook and in paperback on Amazon http://amzn.to/PMdiYB

Inspiration:

The Feel of Paper and Pen VS the Keyboard

Writing can be done manually or electronically. I like to utilize both pen on paper and my keyboard. They each have their benefits. Writing on paper is emotionally satisfying. There is something about actually touching the paper and pen. But I also like the convenience of the keyboard, and who can argue with spellcheck!

Here’s a little peek at my journals and pens:

 

 

“The act of putting pen to paper encourages pause for thought, this in turn makes us think more deeply about life, which helps us regain our equilibrium.” -Norbet Platt

{ 2 comments }

Carol Bodensteiner September 5, 2012 at 6:15 pm

I enjoy your “Resources, Recognition & Inspiration” approach to the topic, Teri. Thanks for including my thoughts in the journaling/blogging discussion. Currently, I’m using ‘green’ notebooks with spiral binding. Lets me feel good about my writing in many ways 😉

Teri Kojetin September 5, 2012 at 6:33 pm

Thank you for sharing with us, Carol! I love notebooks and picked up a small journal last night. Now I have to decide what to do with it or if I want to gift it.

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