HitTail Helps Us Build Our Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service

by Chris O'Byrne on October 24, 2012

I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, hemophilia where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the cover artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, hemophilia where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the cover artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 

7 Steps to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion and Kindle formatting service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, which obscure font your subheadings are in, ed or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, diagnosis anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, hemophilia where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the cover artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 

7 Steps to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion and Kindle formatting service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, which obscure font your subheadings are in, ed or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, diagnosis anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Writing a book, treat even a short one, obesity can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, hemophilia where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the cover artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 

7 Steps to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion and Kindle formatting service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, which obscure font your subheadings are in, ed or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, diagnosis anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Writing a book, treat even a short one, obesity can be a daunting task, even if you have developed writing skills. Writing skills come from time spent writing and learning and writing some more. Fortunately, I’ve had three major periods of my life that have had a significant positive impact on my writing skills. The insights I gained and the lessons I learned from these three major periods have culminated in the development of the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. And although I refer specifically to ebooks here, the 3 Pillars are effective for writing any informational or how-to book.

The first major period of influence, and perhaps the most important, was the seven years I spent teaching high school. After leaving the world of chemical engineering, I decided I wanted work with more meaning. I went back for two more years of school to get my teaching degree and taught science and math. I learned lesson planning inside out and learned every possible technique for more effective teaching. I was driven to become the best teacher I could and read everything I could find related to the subject. I studied books on psychology, cognitive studies, brain function, intrinsic and extrinsic motivation, mind mapping and other organizational techniques, and much more. I read and listened to the works of motivational speakers like Tony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Napoleon Hill, and Zig Ziglar. I read all about selling and learned traditional hard sell and negotiation techniques, in addition to relationship and trust building. I learned about community building and consensus and discipline. In short, I sought out and learned anything even slightly related to teaching that could help me improve.

The second major period of influence came after I ended my teaching career. Discouraged by the growing movement to squelch the creativity of teachers by focusing on merely passing standardized tests, I left the field to pursue my next career. I traveled back and forth across the country selling point-of-sale computer systems to small food co-ops and also trained people to use the system. It was during this time that I learned more about teaching and selling to adults. In my spare time, I learned web design and decided to start my own business. I learned as much as I could about marketing and business and that led me to learn about copywriting.

The third major period of influence was what developed after I started working solely for myself. I developed my web design business and I focused on artists as my niche. I offered marketing consulting services and wrote a popular blog about online marketing for artists. One day I was asked to design and publish a book and that was a turning point. I eventually changed my focus to working with authors and became a freelance editor and publisher. In addition to having a natural aptitude for editing, I was mentored by one of the masters in the field. I also read everything I could find about editing and about becoming a better writer and storyteller.

As I mentioned earlier, these three major periods of influence in my life resulted in my developing the 3 Pillars of Writing Highly Effective Ebooks. These 3 Pillars are:
Teaching
Storytelling
Copywriting

1. Teaching
Most ebooks are instructional by nature and teaching is what they’re all about. The skill of writing lesson plans is invaluable in planning your ebook and helps you create the most effective teaching tool possible. There are also many excellent teaching techniques I’ll show you that will help your readers learn as much as possible.

2. Storytelling
We are naturally captivated by stories. Books that use anecdotes are more interesting than those that don’t. People love to watch the news because the news is all about storytelling. Storytelling is a skill that can be learned by anyone and there are specific steps involved that I’ll teach you.

3. Copywriting
Copywriting has been defined as “selling on paper.” Copywriting techniques are not only effective for selling products; they’re also effective for selling ideas. I’ll teach you to write headlines that grab your reader’s attention and draws them in. I’ll also teach you to write content that is interesting and compelling and helps your readers retain more information and want more.

Using the 3 Pillars to write your ebook not only helps you write clearly and with strong purpose, it also helps you write a book that people talk about and want more of. The 3 Pillars will also help you write longer e-courses and e-mail marketing campaigns designed to help you build your tribe.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, search which obscure font your subheadings are in, anorexia or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, ailment anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, global burden of disease anorexia which obscure font your subheadings are in, ailment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, therapy anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, global burden of disease anorexia which obscure font your subheadings are in, ailment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, therapy anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, generic which obscure font your subheadings are in, treatment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, global burden of disease anorexia which obscure font your subheadings are in, ailment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, therapy anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, generic which obscure font your subheadings are in, treatment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, global burden of disease anorexia which obscure font your subheadings are in, ailment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, therapy anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, generic which obscure font your subheadings are in, treatment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, global burden of disease anorexia which obscure font your subheadings are in, ailment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, therapy anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, generic which obscure font your subheadings are in, treatment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, urologist
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, audiologist
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, pharmacy
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, global burden of disease anorexia which obscure font your subheadings are in, ailment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, therapy anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, generic which obscure font your subheadings are in, treatment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, urologist
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, audiologist
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, pharmacy
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, urologist
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, audiologist
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, pharmacy
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, condom
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, practitioner
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, glands
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, global burden of disease anorexia which obscure font your subheadings are in, ailment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, therapy anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, generic which obscure font your subheadings are in, treatment or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, urologist
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, audiologist
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, pharmacy
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, psychotherapist which obscure font your subheadings are in, or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

Advice From the E-book Editor, health
The Web’s Best Kindle Formatting Service Provider

In Which You Receive a Tip Most Helpful in Making Your Own Ebook

 

A Link to Success

Today, the subject of our blog is links. In today’s world, one of the most popular reading platforms is no longer crafted from the pulp of deceased trees, may they rest in peace. One of the most popular reading platforms is the Kindle, and although it doesn’t have the pleasing smell of a new book, nor can you lend it to a friend when you’re done, or use it to start a fire if you hated it (Sorry, Mrs. Meyer, the 3 minutes of warmth your burning book provided me was far more pleasing than the 45 minutes I spent in agony before I gave up reading it), the Kindle does allow for a lot more technological options.

One of these options is to put links in your book—links that lead to web pages that you want your readers to follow. It may be a link to your blog, or it may be to a website that’s helpful and informative on the topic you wrote your book about. It may be a link to your email address, or a link to your favorite book-reviewing website. It may be a link to a YouTube video in which Smurfs dance with Care Bears to music performed by the cast of Glee. The sky’s the limit here.

Of course, it doesn’t do you much good if you don’t actually know how to insert a link. Well, it’s easy. On your Word doc, you probably have your link written out. For example: www.ebook-editor.com.

Now, just highlight the URL and click Ctrl+K (or Command+K on the Mac). For those who aren’t savvy about keyboard combinations, just hold down your Ctrl key and press the letter “K” on the keyboard. That should bring up some options, only one of which you need to worry about. At the bottom there will be an address bar. Make sure you type in your correct web address in that bar, and click “okay.” There; it’s linked.

But we’re not done linking. There’s an even more important aspect of every book that requires links—the Table of Contents—which we will henceforth refer to as ToC. Hyperlinking the ToC is especially important for nonfiction books. Your readers need to be able to navigate quickly and easily to any section of the book they want to.

There are a few prerequisites to hyperlinking your table of contents. I’ll list them in numerical order from most important to least important.

1. Have your ToC typed out. Make sure it’s on its own page and after the copyright page.

1. Make sure it’s left aligned. Don’t center it or give it a first-line indent.

1. Make sure your ToC is bookmarked. This is easy, easy, easy. Just click your cursor at the beginning of where it reads “Table of Contents” on your ToC page. Then, go to your “Insert” tab on Microsoft Word’s top toolbar. Click on “Bookmark.” Now, enter the name of your bookmark, which should be simply TOC. Click “Okay.” You’re done with that.

1. Make sure every chapter title is in Heading 1 style, and all your sub-chapters are either Heading 1 or Heading 2 style. Every section of your book that you want hyperlinked in the ToC must be in a Heading style, so don’t cut corners. If you don’t know what a style is, that’s okay, because that’s the subject of next week’s blog!

Now to link your ToC to the corresponding chapters in your book. Let’s say your first chapter is “Chapter 1: It was a Dark and Stormy Night.” Go to your “Insert” tab on your toolbar and highlight your chapter title.

Very important: Highlight only the text. Don’t highlight any blank space after the text.

1. It was a Dark and Stormy Night

Once that’s highlighted, click on “Hyperlink” on your top toolbar.

Once the window opens up, you’ll see a column on the left. On that column, select “Places in this document.” All that means is that you’re making a link to something in the document. Pretty straightforward.

Once there, it will give you a list of everything you have in Heading 1 style. Just double-click the corresponding heading on the list, and there you go. It’s hyperlinked. Rinse and repeat with all of your chapter titles.

It will turn your chapter titles in the ToC to blue text, and you can press Ctrl+right-click to follow it.

That’s it, in a very small and easily understandable nutshell.

Be sure to check out next week’s blog on styles. Styles are the most important tool in your toolbox to create a professional-looking ebook, and not only will I open that box and show you the tool, I’ll show how to best use it in the most efficient and time-saving manner known to all of mankind.

Best wishes and happy formatting.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, urologist
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, audiologist
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, pharmacy
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They are the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, condom
they won’t buy your book. Take the time to pick the very best keywords and you’ll see your sales increase.

Using the correct keywords when you self-publish your book is vitally important to the success of your book. However, practitioner
it’s an easy process and doesn’t require much more than about a half hour of your time and only a little bit of creativity.

What’s a Keyword?

A keyword is any word or phrase that’ll help people find your book when they do a search, glands
say on Google or Amazon. It’s as simple as that. But as simple as they are, they’re extremely important in the search process. In fact, they’re what search is all about. Search engines (like Google and Amazon) work because they search for keywords. If you want your book to be found, you need to know how to pick the best keywords and learn where to put them to help people find your book.

Interest—Desire—Buy

There are three main steps in any buying process: Interest, Desire, and Buy. Each of these steps also aligns with Thought, Feeling, and Behavior. Combined, the steps are:

  1. Interest/Thought
  2. Desire/Feeling
  3. Buy/Behavior

The Interest step is where you first get people’s interest by appealing to their rational side, their thought or thinking side. They’re looking for something specific and you do what it takes to make sure your product gets in front of them. They have an interest and you’re making sure that your product is one of those they find right away. If your book shows up on page 10 of the search results, you’re going to sell very few books.

The Desire step is where you engage with their feelings and instill desire. You help them feel trust and confidence in you. You convince them that the features of your product will benefit them and you show them how. You feed the fuel of their desire and make buying the natural next step.
The Buy step is where they perform the behavior that the previous step has led them to. Usually, this is where they buy your product. Sometimes the desired behavior is as simple as giving your email address in exchange for a free book.

Keywords Are Part of the Interest Step

Keywords are part of the first step, the Interest/Thought step. One of my authors, Denise Roessle, has a book that tells the story of when she gave up her child for adoption and then found him again years later. It’s a memoir of what that experience was like for her.
Let’s say that one of her potential readers is looking for stories of people that have given their child up for adoption and then found them again later in life. While doing a search on Amazon, they might enter “adoption stories” or “adoption reunion.” If that’s what they type, and we want them to find Denise’s book, we’d better have those keywords in one or all of three of the following places: the book title, the book description, and the keywords field.

Throughout this whole process, keep in mind that you aren’t choosing keywords based on what you feel sounds good or what you wish your book was about. You’re choosing keywords that people actually type into a search engine—mostly Google or Amazon—to find a book just like yours. Put yourself in the mind of your potential reader.

To learn more about how to identify the keywords that people are actually using and learn what tools we use, go here to get your copy of Choose Keywords That Sell Your Books.
HitTail provides The Ebook Editor with highly-targeted long-tail keywords that help us grow our business. They can do the same for you.

About a month ago I listened to podcast from one of my favorite sites, search Internet Business Mastery. The name of the podcast episode was How to Identify Keywords You Can Easily Rank For with Rob Walling from Hittail and featured HitTail owner, valeologist Rob Walling. About 5 minutes into his presentation, herpes I knew I needed to try HitTail.

What HitTail does is analyze The Ebook Editor’s website traffic and then provides suggestions for keywords. But not just any keywords. They suggest long-tail keywords that not only are highly-targeted, but have low competition. What this means for us is that if we use those keywords on our website, we’ll more easily show up higher in the Google search results.

As an example, one of the first keywords they suggested for us was Kindle formatting service. I started using that keyword throughout the website. I’ve also used it in several blog posts so it was part of our ever-changing and updated content. I also used it in a few backlinks. Before optimizing for that keyword, The Ebook Editor only showed up on the 9th or 1oth page for the keyword Kindle formatting service. When I checked again this morning, we were on the first page!

The main benefit to showing up higher in the Google search results is that we get more traffic and thus more business when people search using the keyword Kindle formatting service. If I had not optimized our website using that keyword, we would certainly have had fewer people come to our site and become customers.

There are other tools you can use to identify potential keywords to target, but HitTail does all the heavy lifting for you and brings you a list of the best long-tail keywords to focus on.

Keep in mind that identifying these keywords is only the first step, albeit an important one. You also have to put those keywords to use. I optimized our website by including the keyword in our main title tag, our meta-description, and also on our conversion page. I also used the keyword in several blog posts and made it one of our blog post categories.

We also have several other keywords that HitTail has provided for us, including azw editor, ebook formatting service, ebook conversion service, professional ebook formatting, and professional kindle formatting. I’ll start using those keywords, also, and we expect to see our business increase as a result.

Give HitTail a try for your own business, even if it’s just selling a single book. The results you’ll receive are worth the low cost. You can sign up for a 21-day trial and then only pay $19.95 a month after that.

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