Book Marketing Workshop

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, men’s health we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, men’s health we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, cardiologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, men’s health we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, cardiologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, illness you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, men’s health we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, cardiologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, illness you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.

In this lesson, anemia you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, health we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.
Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, men’s health we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, cardiologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, illness you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.

In this lesson, anemia you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, health we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, medicine we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, men’s health we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, cardiologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, illness you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.

In this lesson, anemia you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, health we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, medicine we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, neuropathologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

Keywords are one of the most powerful tools you have for selling your book. They’re the key to that very first step—getting discovered by your potential reader. If they don’t find your book, about it they won’t buy your book. We find the very best keywords so you’ll see your sales increase.

We perform a full keyword research process for you based on the practices outlined in the book, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books, a book that teaches authors how to find and use the best search terms to help people find their book.

In addition, we also do keyword mapping that identifies which keywords to focus on, which pages to use those keywords on, and how to use them to the greatest effect.

Here is what your Keyword Research Package includes:

• We perform a seed keyword process to discover what people are actually entering as search terms.

• We use the Google Keywords Tool to determine the best possible keywords to use and creating a prioritized list of keywords.

• Keyword mapping to use the absolute best keywords in the best possible places

• We use Amazon’s keyword tool and compiling a list of 7 final keywords to use on Amazon.

• You receive a copy of our ebook, Choose Keywords That Sell More Books.

Your cost for all of these keyword research services in one package is only $249.

Contact us and get quick answers.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, adiposity we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles For a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Prepare and Use Images – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Perform Additional Cleaning for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Endnotes for a Professional Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Upload Your Ebook to Amazon – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, hemorrhoids we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, implant you’ll learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far, sildenafil in previous articles, I’ve given you 7 tips on how to save time and make your e-formatting experience a more pleasant and less time-consuming one http://www.ebook-editor.com/7-tips-to-perform-your-own-kindle-formatting-service/

And also how to insert links, both internal and external http://www.ebook-editor.com/create-links-in-microsoft-word/

Both of those articles have one thing in common—they both mention styles as the most important tool you have in turning your raw Microsoft Word doc file into a professional-looking ebook. With styles, you’ll end up with a professional ebook conversion.

To actually see what a style is, open up your document in Word.

Go to your “Home” tab on the top toolbar. On the top right half of the screen, you should see this:

These are styles. As you can see, “Normal” style has a yellow border.

What Is A Style?

So far I’ve showed you where to find your styles, but I haven’t told you what they are. What a style is, in its simplest definition, is a tool that Microsoft Word has to define your text to be uniform and easy on the eyes. Not only that, it saves hours of time, because with a click of a button you can apply a whole set of formatting choices, without you having to do it manually over and over. Here are a few of the formatting choices you can apply with a style:

  • Text color, font, and size
  • First line indents
  • Block text
  • Bold, italic, or underlined
  • Centered, left aligned, right aligned
  • Page breaks before or after
  • Spaces before/after

What’s so great about that, you might ask. Seems you can do that anyway, without bothering with styles. Well…yes, you can, but it might take you hours to accomplish. Who wants to go through each individual chapter title, highlight it, and manually change the font size, center it, give it a space after the body text, and anything else you may do to make your chapter title unique?

With a style, you can set all that up quickly, and once set up, all you need to do is highlight your chapter title and click the corresponding style in your Home tab. Easy.

Let’s get started. The first thing you want to do is set your entire document to “Normal” style. Everything—title page, copyright page, acknowledgements, about the author—all of it.

“Normal” style is what the biggest portion of your book will be in. It’s your main body text. The part of the book that everyone buys the book to read.

In order to change your document to “Normal” style, we need to set it to how we want it.

So, go to your Home tab, and right-click on your “Normal” style. It will give you a dropdown menu. Click on “modify…” You’ll see this:

This is where you define how you want your text to look.

For fiction, I recommend these settings, and these are settings you can make right in the above window:
Font: Times New Roman, 12pt, automatic (black)
Left Aligned
No bold, no italics, no underline
Single line spacing

When you’re done, it should look like this:

Normal style window with proper settings

Now, on the bottom left of that window, you’ll see a little button where it says “Format.” Click it, and on the dropdown, choose “paragraph…”

You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the line and page break options.

Uncheck all of those boxes. You don’t need them. Now click on “Indents and Spacing.” You’ll see this:

Normal style window that lets you choose the indent and spacing options.

This is where you define indents and spacing.

If your book is fiction, give it a first-line indent. To do this, click the arrow on the “Special” box. The one that currently reads (none). There will be an option for first-line indent. Click it. Now, to the right is where you decide how big of an indent. Give it a 0.3” indent.

What that does is it indents the first line of every paragraph. We have, in a few clicks, eliminated the need to ever press the dreaded “Tab” button ever again, or space each first line of a paragraph manually with the spacebar.

If you’re writing non-fiction, don’t give it a first line indent. Better to keep it as block text.

This window is also where we define spacing. For fiction, there shouldn’t be any at all. Make sure the before and after spacing is 0. Also make sure it’s single line spacing. Click okay. Then click okay again on the next screen.

Congratulations, you have defined your very first style!

Now all of your body text will be Times New Roman, 12pt font, black, have a first-line indent of 0.3,” single line spacing, and is left aligned.

Remember how I said we’re going to change the entire document to “Normal” style? Now it’s time. Highlight your entire document by pressing Ctrl+A (hold down your Ctrl button and press A on your keyboard). Now just click “Normal” on your home tab. It’s done, and it’s a great start.

But you aren’t done, yet. Now all of your chapter titles have to be styled. For this, we use Heading 1 style. We follow the same steps, the only difference is that we use different options. So, right click where it says “Heading 1” and click on “modify…”

On the initial window, make these changes:
Times New Roman, 16pt font, Centered, Bold

It should look like this:

Initial Heading 1 style window that allows you to choose font and alignment options.

Now, click on “Format” on the bottom left. Uncheck all of the boxes except “page break before.”

What this does is it makes a new page for every chapter title. That way a new chapter doesn’t begin on the same page that a previous chapter ends.

Now click on “indents and spacing,” just like we did with normal style.

Make sure it’s centered, NO first-line indent, and give it an “after” spacing of 12. Don’t give it a before space. What that does is it makes sure that there is a space between your chapter title and the text that begins your chapter.

There, that’s it. Now go through your document, highlight each chapter title, and click “Heading 1” on your Home tab.

Using Heading 1 style also has a surprise bonus—when you create your Table of Contents, the chapter titles in Heading 1 style will be listed in your hyperlink window, making for a fast and easy Table of Contents making experience.

Now that you know how to set a style, and apply a style to your document, you’re well on your way to making a professional ebook conversion for Kindle and all other platforms. Every week I’ll be giving you more and more guidance on how to properly format your Word doc until you know everything there is to know about making your own ebook. Stay tuned, as next week we’ll continue our lessons on applying styles.

Until next time, happy formatting!

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, men’s health we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

 Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, cardiologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

In this lesson, illness you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.

In this lesson, anemia you’ll continue to learn how to use styles for a professional ebook conversion.

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

So far in our series on how to make an ebook, health we’ve covered 7 tips that save time and frustration, how to insert links (internal and external), and how to use and modify styles.

Today, in the sincere hope that you’re still eager to learn how make your own ebook, make that ebook look professional, and create it with a minimal amount of effort and frustration, I’ve decided to show you how to format what is called “front matter.”

 

Front Matter

What is front matter?

Front matter is everything in your book that comes before your story. For your convenience, here’s a list of what encompasses front matter:

  1. Title page
  2. Copyright page
  3. Acknowledgements
  4. Dedication

Every book, your book included, should have front matter, and making front matter look great is easy if you know how.

 

Title Page

The title page is especially easy because you don’t need to give it a different style. Just keep it in Normal style. Follow these guidelines:

Title: Times New Roman, 16pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Subtitle (if applicable): Times New Roman, 14pt font, centered, bold, space after.

Author’s name: Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered, NOT bold.

Important: if your book is fiction, the Normal style will be set to have a first-line indent. If you center something with a first-line indent, it won’t really be centered; it will be to the right of center. To remove this, highlight all of the text on the title page and go to your paragraph options and set your first line indent to 0.

To get to the paragraph options, go to your home tab on your top toolbar of Word and you’ll see the box that has all of the paragraph options. Left aligned, centered, right aligned, etc. At the bottom right corner of this box there will be a tiny little arrow. I’ve circled it in red in the image below. (If you have Word for Mac, click on Format in the top menu and choose Paragraph.)

The small arrow that opens up paragraph options in Word. It's circled in red.

You’re done with your title page. Easy, no? It’s all downhill from here. Let’s move on to the copyright page.

 

Copyright Page

The copyright page only needs 2 things:

Copyright 2012 (or whichever year) Author Name (whatever your name is)
All rights reserved.
Smashwords Edition

If you’re uploading your Word file to Smashwords, also add “Smashwords Edition” to the copyright page. Note: It should only be there when you distribute to Smashwords. Leave that out for when you submit to Amazon and B&N.

The first thing you need to do is put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style. If you’re confused about styles, see my previous post on how to modify and use styles http://www.ebook-editor.com/how-to-use-styles-to-for-a-professional-ebook-conversion/. For those of you familiar with styles, you are now probably very confused as to why I would put “Copyright 2012 Author Name” in Heading 1 style.

As you may know, Heading 1 style is normally used for chapter titles. Why? We modify Heading 1 so that the font is bigger, centered, has a space after and—most importantly—has an automatic page break before.

Why then, should we put the first line of the copyright page in Heading 1 style? There’s only one easy and straightforward answer: Barnes and Noble. Allow me to explain.

When you submit a Word .doc to B&N, it will NOT start something on a new page unless that page has a page break before it. The real problem is, though, that it doesn’t recognize manually inserted page breaks. The page break has to be from the style the text is in.

If you aren’t publishing to B&N, skip this part. If you are, keep reading.

In order to circumvent B&N’s conversion software’s willful refusal to start anything on a new page without it being styled to include an automatic page break, all we need to do is make sure that the pages in our front matter start in Heading 1 style.

It’s simple, really. You put the first line in Heading 1 style, and then manually format it to look like the rest of the text. Now that you have the first line of your copyright page in Heading 1 style, change it to:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, left aligned.

Now you need to remove the space after. Your Heading 1 style should have a 12pt space after. That’s easy to remove, too. Again, go to your paragraph options.

The paragraph options window in Word. The place where you would remove the space after is encircled.

Change that 12 to 0.

Good deal. For the rest of your copyright page, put it in Normal style and remove the first-line indents in the same way we removed it from the title of your book. Space them apart one line by using your Enter key. There, you’re done with the copyright page.

 

Acknowledgements

This is the easiest of them all. Put the word “Acknowledgements” in Heading 1 style. No tweaks, just leave it as is. For the body text (all the people you’re acknowledging) put that it Normal style. You’re done.

 

Dedication Page

For your dedication page, put it all in Heading 1 style. Most people center their dedication. So, once in Heading 1 style, do this:

Times New Roman, 12pt font, centered.

Some people put their dedication in italics. This is a matter of preference, so feel free to do so.

Pro tip: Don’t title your dedication page. Don’t have “Dedication” centered in big words up top. When you dedicate a book to someone, people don’t need to see “Dedication” looming over the page to know that you’re clearly dedicating the book to someone.

 

You now have simple but professional-looking front matter for your ebook. Not only that, you’ve learned to change text that’s already been modified by a style. Barnes & Noble will never get the better of you with their archaic conversion software. Feel free to go to their website and let loose a hearty belly-laugh at their attempts to thwart your ebook-making magic. You’re now well on your way to knowing how to perform your own professional ebook conversion.

Until next time, happy formatting.

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, medicine we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Format Front Matter – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

Learn how to make an ebook with our step-by-step instructions. These are the current articles in the series. Once we’re done, neuropathologist we’ll organize them all into an easy-to-learn format for you so you can make your own ebook and save yourself money.

5 Steps To A Successful Ebook Conversion – How to Make an Ebook Series

7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 1 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Use Styles to For a Professional Ebook Conversion – Part 2 – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Links in Microsoft Word – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create Bullet Points and Numbered Lists – How to Make an Ebook Series

How to Create a Website That
Converts Visitors to Customers

February 16, therapy 2013
9:00 a.m to 3:00 p.m.

Comfort Inn — Green Valley
90 W Esperanza Blvd
Green Valley, site AZ

My phone number: 520-261-3101
My email: chris@ebook-editor.com

Most authors know how important it is to have their own website. But the static, bland website that most authors have doesn’t help you connect with your readers or sell your books. Some authors have fancy websites with pretty graphics and even video, but they usually aren’t any more helpful. What you need is a website that converts your visitors to customers, and that isn’t done by chance. You need to know the answers to the following questions:

  1. How do I find out who my target readers really are?
  2. How do I attract them to my website?
  3. How do I get them to join my mailing list? (And why you really want one.)
  4. How do I keep my readers engaged?
  5. Most of all—how do I get them to buy my books?

Join me on Saturday, February 16th to learn the answers to these questions and much more. Learn what to put on each page, how many pages you need, and so much more.

Anyone who has attended a previous workshop knows how much information I give. My goal is to make you leave with your brains so full they’re ready to pop. Also included is an extensive hand-out and continuing access to me via email even after the workshop.

Sign up below to attend the workshop.
The cost is $75 for this all-day workshop (9:00—3:00). Lunch is on your own from Noon—1:00 and the Arizona Restaurant is next door to the Comfort Inn.

 

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