7 Tips to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook – How to Make an Ebook Series

by Rob O'Byrne on October 3, 2012

I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, hemophilia where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the cover artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, order where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, clinic where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, visit web is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, healing where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, what is ed is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, prescription and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

 

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, sickness where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, this is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, angina and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

RECOGNITION:

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, nurse where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, order is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist, and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife Gera. He is a self-described weather “nerd.” His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, health system where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 
I’d like to introduce you to Steve LaNore. He describes the journey of what publishing and promoting an eBook has been like.

Steve LaNore is the Chief Meteorologist at KXII-TV, hemophilia where he has served in this capacity since 2006. His television career includes nine years in San Antonio and six years in Austin. He is a five-time award-winning meteorologist with nearly three decades of broadcast experience, is an AMS Certified Broadcast Meteorologist and has completed the National Weather Service advanced Skywarn training program. His passion for encouraging children to learn led to the creation of this book.

He lives in a small community north of Dallas with his wife, Gera. He is a self-described weather nerd. His interests go well beyond weather to include music, art, history, and philosophy—and all things science.

I asked him to write about his experience with getting his ebook published and how his promotion of it has been:

I love to write, but I tend to have a half-dozen projects running around the track at any given time, making for turtle progress on each. I spent three years on a book that should have taken three months. Oh well, lessons learned; I’m better focused now.

After the words and pictures were done, I mulled over the option to offer an ebook. I was concerned readers wouldn’t pay $12 for a book by a completely unknown author. I hoped the $3 price tag would attract more readers, so I threw my hat in the ebook ring and the process began.

Contacting several local authors who offered publishing services helped me realize what I didn’t want to pay for an ebook conversion. Their prices were sky high. Further digging online landed me among more competitive rates. I chose The Ebook Editor because they offered the most lucid response to my initial query and had a customer service attitude from the start. Their rates were right in line with similar firms, so it was not a price-only decision. They also offered cover art work which I desperately needed.

The editing process was relatively painless since I had already re-written the book four times; still, I had to accept a change here or there. My advice to all authors is this: Your book is probably not the best thing since the invention of the air conditioner. Be willing to accept changes within reason; most of mine were grammatical.

Getting the images into a proper submission size was my greatest conversion challenge. It took a couple of days as I had to re-scan and re-size many of the large color images.  It wasn’t that difficult, just time consuming. The first draft of the cover art was superb but then one finds myriads of things that “could be a little better this way or that” to drive themself crazy with doubt. I fell into this trap, but thanks to the patience and talent of the cover artist, Debbie O’Byrne, the cover turned out fantastic!

Another hurdle was getting all of the hyperlinks in the book to work. Sometimes links become unstable for no reason, so my advice to anyone getting an ebook conversion is to check each link in the final draft before it is uploaded. The Ebook Editor staff was both courteous and tenacious, and they got all of the links to work after a few tries. They submitted the final draft and after my approval uploaded it to accounts I had set up on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

So now I had an ebook online—I had made it—I couldn’t wait for the orders to pour in.  In my exuberance, I told my mother to expect sales of 500 copies in 3 months. Can you say delusional.com?

My television station offered to run numerous free commercials on the book a month later. When I learned of this I had an immediate surge of optimism that perhaps my prediction to Mom would come true.

I also appeared as a guest on two dominant local radio stations promoting the book, and over the course of two months sent notes or wall posts to many hundreds of Facebook science and education sites across the nation. In fact, Facebook flagged me as a spammer so I had to cool my jets there. I also tried Google Adwords and Facebook paid advertising with almost no success. I sent press releases on the book to area educators since the target audience is 8 to 12 year olds and the book is written as a humorous teaching tool. I’m also working to get booked on various Internet radio shows, but my genre is probably an obstacle here. Self-help authors, financial gurus and spiritual messengers seem to do best on Web radio.

Reviews of the book from kids and adults have been strong; primarily from people that I do not know. My conclusion is that it’s tremendously hard to get noticed amidst the flotsam of the Web; but my tenacity remains intact.

I have learned you must put on the armor and get ready for the world to be a whole lot less excited about the book than you are. Even your friends may not buy one.

I have not given up as it’s only been a few months since I rolled out the greatest kids’ science book ever. I hope you know that I’m kidding, although I do believe in the product because it’s very solid. My confidence in the book is based on evidence from others as well as my own heart. I think you have to have a little of both to remain assured there’s potential for success. It’s a tough road: but not an impossible one.

On the plus side, The Ebook Editor was a delight to work with and made that portion of the process rather painless. In fact, it was the easiest step in getting from my desktop PC to the “for sale” sign. Special thanks to them for all that they did on my project!

Oh—and don’t forget to buy one for your kids or grandkids; Christmas is coming! J

About the Ebook:


Weather Wits and Science Snickers
is a new science joke ebook which combines laughter, liking and learning. It’s geared to ages 8 and up.

Roll your eyes at the silly jokes while you enjoy the custom full-color illustrations, and pick up some neat facts along the way too.

There’s a “What’s Going On” section after each joke to combine learning with the silliness. Many real-world images and links for further reading make this a great resource. Since the links are “live” in the Kindle, it’s very convenient to check out a link and then resume reading if you like.

The combination of corny jokes and cool facts that make it a great teaching tool for kids, and a fun and breezy read for adults.

You can follow the ebook at facebook.com/weatherwits.

The author has sample pages from the book and links to Amazon and B&N for ordering from his personal website: www.stevelanore.com

 

7 Steps to Perform Your Own Kindle Formatting Service for Your Ebook is part of our ongoing How to Make an Ebook Series as part of our Professional Ebook Conversion and Kindle Formatting Service.

Microsoft Word is bar none the best program to convert your manuscript into a professional-looking ebook. I’m going to give you some pointers I’ve learned over the course of my ebook conversion and Kindle formatting service career.

1. Don’t be a Picky Ricky or a Picky Vicky. Getting your book to appear exactly as you imagine it on an e-reader is not going to happen. Your book can still look marvelous on Kindle without you deciding that you need to be in charge of where every page starts or ends, which obscure font your subheadings are in, ed or any other specific formatting that Amazon will just throw out the window, diagnosis anyway. For those of you with complicated and extravagant layouts, keep this in mind: People want to read your book for the story or information that’s inside. If they wanted to be impressed with elegant fonts, uniquely complicated structure, and images placed helter-skelter, they would read their grandma’s scrapbook or go to an art museum. If the purpose of your book is for people to read it, then give the readers what they want—something that’s simple and easy to read. That isn’t to say images are bad to have in your book. They aren’t. But tactical and practical placement of them is important.

2. Styles. Love them, learn them, and use them. They’re the best tool in your belt for converting ebooks. Using styles will save you hours of frustration and time. There’s no point in going to each individual chapter title, highlighting it, selecting the size, font, whether it should be bold/italic/underlined, giving it a manual page break, and centering it when all of this can be done with one click of the mouse.

3. Find and Replace option. This is one of your best friends. Using Find and Replace properly will make your document look uniform and professional, plus it saves loads of time. Replace all double spaces with a single space, remove tabs, or even changing all underlined text to italics can all be done with Find and Replace.
If you decide you want to change the name of your main character (or any character for that matter) it does it all for you. Suppose your main character’s name is “Nina,” but you decide that you like it spelled better as “Nena.” Find and Replace will do this for you, eliminating the need to go through the document and do it each one individually.

4. Change all curly quotes to straight quotes using AutoFormat. It can be found under File ? Options ? Proofing ? Autocorrect options ? AutoFormat on Word for PC or under Format ? AutoFormat on Word for Mac.
Using curly quotes looks pretty, but they’re very fickle and easily get turned around. The same goes for using apostrophes for single quotation marks for a quote inside of a quote. Using the single quotation mark option insures that none of your quotation marks will face the wrong direction. Trust me, nobody is going to read your book and exclaim, “I just cannot believe this person used straight quotation marks! How very amateurish! Darling, you must come see how this poor misguided author chose to neglect the use of curly quotation marks, which is no doubt the most uncontested and irrefutable method of capturing the reader’s attention!”

5. The All-Knowing Show/Hide option. On your home tab, it just looks like a paragraph symbol (¶). If you have a PC, I’ll save you from trying to find it and just tell you to press ctrl+shift+8. This shows you everything—word spaces, paragraph breaks, page breaks, or odd characters that appear for no apparent reason in your kindle that don’t show up in your document. This is, besides your brain, the best troubleshooting method you have. If you can’t figure out why something isn’t spaced properly, or won’t space properly, or won’t indent properly, or won’t do what you want it to because it has a mind of its own, this will usually tell you exactly what’s wrong. There have been many times that I’ve pondered over something I just couldn’t figure out, tried everything I could think of to fix it, and then clicked the show/hide option, which in its infinite wisdom revealed to me the problem and solution. Use this option. It will save a lot of brainaches.

6. Remember to save often. This sounds like a no-brainer because it is a no-brainer. Most programs, Microsoft Word included, have an autosave feature that saves your document every few minutes, but most software doesn’t take into account power outages, your cat pressing it’s paw against your power button, a cyberjerk who sends you a virus that closes all your programs and turns your screen upside down, or something as simple and common as your program not responding for whatever reason.
Save often. Trust me.

7. Unless you’re from the great state of Minnesota, where it’s taught that taking work breaks is for sissies, lazy people, procrastinators, delinquents, and “those gosh-darn loiterers, takin’ breaks when work could be done, darn tootin’,” I highly encourage you to take breaks as often as you need to. The work will get done. Staring at a Word doc for any length of time can mess with your brain. And, let’s face it, converting a manuscript to an ebook can be a repetitive and tedious task. Have a cup of tea, play Frisbee with your dog, or do whatever it is you do when you aren’t at your computer. Coming back after even just a few minutes will give you a fresh perspective on what needs to be done.

Whether you’re looking for a Kindle formatting service or ready to tackle the work on your own, I hope these tips carry you far.

Kindle formatting services for your ebook at The Ebook Editor

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